"The canvas is a place of discovery for me. I use intuition and chance to activate a space with spontaneous gesture to achieve an energy that holds together in an integrated way. In this painting the orb could represent a moon and the hanging bellflowers, an invention that I use in many paintings, as a reference to the flora that exists in nature. Mostly it is an imaginary space that is meant to reflect the subliminal beauty of the natural world."

 

“Burning Moon” 2008
Mixed Media on Canvas, 59” x 48” (150 x 121 cm),
Retail Price $ 18.300


"The sea has always attracted me and living in Miami makes it very accessible. In this painting I imagined an underwater landscape with my unique bellflowers  layered within an ocean garden. The luminous blues reflect the water and an otherworldly light emanates making this a mystical vision."

 

“Blue Bayou” 2017
Burned and dyed Japanese paper, resin, ink, acrylic, 36” x 36" (91 x 91 cm)
Retail Price $ 11.700


"Ignited fuses, gunpowder and burned and dyed Japanese paper make this silver panel a voyage into the mangrove root system and creates a way to experience a unique ecosystem particular to a subtropical coastline, as in South Florida."

 

“Magenta Mangroves” 2017
Ignited gunpowder, ink, burnt and dyed Japanese paper, silver emulsion on canvas, 72” x 60" (183 x 152 cm)
Retail Price $ 20.000


Mira Lehr

Please give us a short description of your work.

My work is always natured-based, having to do with environmental issues and the beauty of nature. I work at the intersection of art, nature, science and performance in the eco-feminist tradition.

 

You work with many different materials: gunpowder, acrylic, Japanese paper, charcoal…  How do you decide what materials to use? 

 

My medium determined by the work I am doing. Some pieces require the residue left from ignition of gunpowder and fuses. Some call for the transparency and color of dyed and burned Japanese paper. Almost everything I do has a fire element in it. This helps to combine the idea of creation and destruction as in nature.

The materials you use in your work seems ever expanding. What drives this? 

 

New materials inspire new work, so I like to keep myself on my toes by not getting too comfortable with any specific medium. As soon as I think my work is becoming predictable, I will change the medium. It must excite me.

 

Which materials do you prefer at the moment?

At the moment I am using rope to build mangrove trees. I’ve started to do more outdoor sculpture for public art. I have many ideas for paintings that I will go to after I finish this series.

 

Do you always try to work with new materials? And: where do you find them?

New materials inspire new work, so I like to keep myself on my toes by not getting too comfortable with any specific medium. As soon as I think my work is becoming predictable, I will change the medium. It must excite me.

 

Which materials do you prefer at the moment?

At the moment I am using rope to build mangrove trees. I’ve started to do more outdoor sculpture for public art. I have many ideas for paintings that I will go to after I finish this series.

 

What inspires your work?

It is always inspired by nature, in fact, when I get stuck I will look at a tree to remind myself about its beautiful structure and it always helps.

 
Nature is a constant theme in your work. What about Miami influences your practice? 

 

I am very much a product of Miami. Miami Beach, where I live, is just a few feet above sea level, and I live on the water.  I’ve spent many years on beaches surf-combing for shells, exploring the sea life and enchanted by the light reflections from the water. I have made many works based on the beautiful and mysterious jellyfish, the tropical foliage, the jewel-like colors of flowers indigenous to Miami, and never get tired of the subtropical landscape.

 

What do you enjoy doing when you are not working as an artist?

I like to listen to music and read about science.

 

Where is your favorite place to be in Miami?

My garden, which was designed by the great landscape architect, Dan Kiley. He made a miracle of structure with Royal Palms, limestone pavers and decorative walls. 

 

What are you working on currently?

I am presently working on my museum-wide exhibition called “Tracing the Red Thread” for the Museum of Contemporary Art in North Miami. It opens in the Fall and I have created all new work for it. It is about the environment and the ecology of South Florida. It features my new mangrove sculptures, resin-cast jellyfish, corals, paintings, silver-emulsion panels, and a 40 foot long painting about the sea.

______________________________

EDUCATION

 

- Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York, B.A. Art History

- The Boston Museum School, Massachusetts, Postgraduate work

- Robert Motherwell, painting

 

- Nieves and James Billmyer, annual workshops

 

PUBLICATIONS

- Collins, Thom; Heartney, Eleanor; Sandler, Irving; Mira Lehr: Arc of Nature. Hard Press Editions and Hudson Hills Press, Stockbridge, MA (Published April 2015)


- Lehr, Mira, “Woman and Tree: A Tanglewood Story”, 2010

 

 

- Barter, Judith. American Modernism at the Art Institute of Chicago. Yale University Press, New Haven, CT, 2009


- Domina, Lynn; Poets on the Psalms, Trinity University Press, San Antonio, TX, 2008; Cover image: Mira Lehr       

 

- Cloister, 2006, Mixed Media on Canvas, 60 x 54 inches

 

- Clemence, Paul; Davidow, Julie; Miami Contemporary Artists, Schiffer Publishing Ltd., Atglen, PA, 2007


- Zevitas, Steven T., New American Paintings, The Open Studios Press, New York, NY, 2007



"The canvas is a place of discovery for me. I use intuition and chance to activate a space with spontaneous gesture to achieve an energy that holds together in an integrated way. In this painting the orb could represent a moon and the hanging bellflowers, an invention that I use in many paintings, as a reference to the flora that exists in nature. Mostly it is an imaginary space that is meant to reflect the subliminal beauty of the natural world."

 

“Burning Moon” 2008
Mixed Media on Canvas, 59” x 48”,
$11,000 (plus commission)


"The sea has always attracted me and living in Miami makes it very accessible. In this painting I imagined an underwater landscape with my unique bellflowers  layered within an ocean garden. The luminous blues reflect the water and an otherworldly light emanates making this a mystical vision."

 

“Blue Bayou” 2017
Burned and dyed Japanese paper, resin, ink,acrylic, 36” x 36"
$7,000 (plus commission)


"Ignited fuses, gunpowder and burned and dyed Japanese paper make this silver panel a voyage into the mangrove root system and creates a way to experience a unique ecosystem particular to a subtropical coastline, as in South Florida."

 

“Magenta Mangroves” 2017
Ignited gunpowder, ink, burnt and dyed Japanese paper, silver emulsion on canvas, 72” x 60"
$12,000 (plus commission)


Mira Lehr

Please give us a short description of your work.

My work is always natured-based, having to do with environmental issues and the beauty of nature. I work at the intersection of art, nature, science and performance in the eco-feminist tradition.

 

You work with many different materials: gunpowder, acrylic, Japanese paper, charcoal…  How do you decide what materials to use? 

 

My medium determined by the work I am doing. Some pieces require the residue left from ignition of gunpowder and fuses. Some call for the transparency and color of dyed and burned Japanese paper. Almost everything I do has a fire element in it. This helps to combine the idea of creation and destruction as in nature.

The materials you use in your work seems ever expanding. What drives this? 

 

New materials inspire new work, so I like to keep myself on my toes by not getting too comfortable with any specific medium. As soon as I think my work is becoming predictable, I will change the medium. It must excite me.

 

Which materials do you prefer at the moment?

At the moment I am using rope to build mangrove trees. I’ve started to do more outdoor sculpture for public art. I have many ideas for paintings that I will go to after I finish this series.

 

Do you always try to work with new materials? And: where do you find them?

New materials inspire new work, so I like to keep myself on my toes by not getting too comfortable with any specific medium. As soon as I think my work is becoming predictable, I will change the medium. It must excite me.

 

Which materials do you prefer at the moment?

At the moment I am using rope to build mangrove trees. I’ve started to do more outdoor sculpture for public art. I have many ideas for paintings that I will go to after I finish this series.

 

What inspires your work?

It is always inspired by nature, in fact, when I get stuck I will look at a tree to remind myself about its beautiful structure and it always helps.

 
Nature is a constant theme in your work. What about Miami influences your practice? 

 

I am very much a product of Miami. Miami Beach, where I live, is just a few feet above sea level, and I live on the water.  I’ve spent many years on beaches surf-combing for shells, exploring the sea life and enchanted by the light reflections from the water. I have made many works based on the beautiful and mysterious jellyfish, the tropical foliage, the jewel-like colors of flowers indigenous to Miami, and never get tired of the subtropical landscape.

 

What do you enjoy doing when you are not working as an artist?

I like to listen to music and read about science.

 

Where is your favorite place to be in Miami?

My garden, which was designed by the great landscape architect, Dan Kiley. He made a miracle of structure with Royal Palms, limestone pavers and decorative walls. 

 

What are you working on currently?

I am presently working on my museum-wide exhibition called “Tracing the Red Thread” for the Museum of Contemporary Art in North Miami. It opens in the Fall and I have created all new work for it. It is about the environment and the ecology of South Florida. It features my new mangrove sculptures, resin-cast jellyfish, corals, paintings, silver-emulsion panels, and a 40 foot long painting about the sea.

______________________________

EDUCATION

 

- Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York, B.A. Art History

- The Boston Museum School, Massachusetts, Postgraduate work

- Robert Motherwell, painting

 

- Nieves and James Billmyer, annual workshops

 

PUBLICATIONS

- Collins, Thom; Heartney, Eleanor; Sandler, Irving; Mira Lehr: Arc of Nature. Hard Press Editions and Hudson Hills Press, Stockbridge, MA (Published April 2015)


- Lehr, Mira, “Woman and Tree: A Tanglewood Story”, 2010

 

 

- Barter, Judith. American Modernism at the Art Institute of Chicago. Yale University Press, New Haven, CT, 2009


- Domina, Lynn; Poets on the Psalms, Trinity University Press, San Antonio, TX, 2008; Cover image: Mira Lehr       

 

- Cloister, 2006, Mixed Media on Canvas, 60 x 54 inches

 

- Clemence, Paul; Davidow, Julie; Miami Contemporary Artists, Schiffer Publishing Ltd., Atglen, PA, 2007


- Zevitas, Steven T., New American Paintings, The Open Studios Press, New York, NY, 2007